BPC Evidence Type

Emerging Practice(2 summaries)

Implementing a K–12 Dual Language Enrichment (DLE) Program―Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD

Area:
English Language Learners (ELL)

District:
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo Independent School District

Overview:
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD (PSJA ISD) serves a student population (total = 31,223) that is 0.3% African American, 99% Hispanic, 0.8% White, 0.2% Asian/Pacific Islander, 89% economically disadvantaged, 42% Limited English Proficient (LEP), and 74% at risk.

Students participating in a K–12 dual language pilot program, many of whom started out as English language learners (ELL), have consistently performed better than their peers on TAKS in all subject areas (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

 In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Piloted a K–12 Spanish/English Dual Language Enrichment (DLE) program and gradually expanded it districtwide
  • Provides dual language instruction as enrichment, not remediation
  • Offers core-area content and elective courses taught in Spanish at all school levels
  • Provides primary language instruction and support for newcomers at any grade level, including secondary grades, through the DLE program
  • Provides training and support for teachers to ensure a high degree of fidelity in program implementation
Targeted Supplemental Algebra Readiness Support for Struggling Students—James S. Hogg Middle School

Area: 
Mathematics/Algebra Readiness

Campus/District:
James S. Hogg Middle School
Tyler Independent School District

Overview:
James S. Hogg Middle School (HMS) serves a student population (total = 505) that is 32% African American, 53% Hispanic, 15% White, 80% economically disadvantaged, 28% limited English proficient (LEP), and 63% at risk.

The percentage of Grade 7 students participating in programming for struggling students passing mathematics TAKS increased from 2.4% passing in 2008–09, prior to program participation, to 40.9% passing in 2009–10. Of the Grade 8 students participating in the program, 6.5% passed mathematics TAKS in 2008–09, and 62.5% passed after participating in the program (see Supporting Evidence for more information).  

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Used a TEA Middle School Students in Texas: Algebra Ready (MSTAR) Pilot grant to implement intensive algebra readiness programming for targeted groups of struggling students in Grades 7–8
  • Provided extended learning time through double-blocked mathematics courses for target groups
  • Integrated lesson extensions and technology-based activities using a supplemental curriculum package to enhance mathematics instruction
  • Integrated use of additional technology resources with local funding into intervention programming to enhance student engagement
  • Supported participating teachers with professional development, ongoing coaching, and planning time
  • Extended the programming to Grade 6 to provide additional support for struggling students at each grade level at the campus
  • Created another option to support more struggling students in mathematics through additional double-blocked mathematics courses

Established Best Practice(26 summaries)

Campuswide Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)—Berkner High School

Area: 
College and Career Readiness   

Campus/District:
L.V. Berkner High School
Richardson Independent School District   

Overview:
Berkner High School (BHS) serves a student population (total = 2,721) that is approximately 30% African American, 23% Hispanic, 30% White, 0.4% Native American, 17% Asian/Pacific Islander, 44% economically disadvantaged, 5% limited English proficient (LEP), and 47% at risk.

Staff reported that the percentage of BHS economically disadvantaged students passing TAKS (all tests) improved as a result of the program as approximately 70% of participants were economically disadvantaged. The percentage of BHS economically disadvantaged students passing TAKS (all tests) increased from 50% passing in 2005–06 to 75% passing in 2009–10 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Involves increasing numbers of teachers in the AVID interdisciplinary site team, campus activities, and student mentoring program
  • Includes a focus on AVID in campus staff development and hiring processes
  • Expanded AVID elective course offerings to all grade levels and conducts ongoing student recruitment
  • Offers enhancements to the program, including an AVID club, parent activities, and a mentoring program in conjunction with the district’s Communities in Schools program through which AVID students mentor elementary students
  • Collaborates with a local community college to offer dual enrollment programming for AVID students
  • Offers college preparation and awareness building activities
  • Became a national AVID demonstration site
  • Used a Texas High School Project Exemplar grant to expand AVID strategies to all students

 

Collaborative Monitoring and Intervention Model--Aldine ISD

Area:
Structures to Support Learning

District:
Aldine Independent School District

Overview:
Aldine ISD (AISD) serves a student population (total = 61,299) that is 29.6% African American, 1.8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 65.3% Hispanic,3.3% White, 85% economically disadvantaged, 31.8% Limited English Proficient (LEP), and 70.1% at risk.

Since 2004–05, the percentages of AISD economically disadvantaged, LEP, and at-risk students passing TAKS (all tests) were consistently above state and peer district group averages for similar student groups (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Facilitates collaboration across vertical clusters, interventions, and program areas (i.e., Title I,  special education, multilingual services, Career and Technical Education, and content program areas)
  • Uses a comprehensive curriculum management system to provide immediate results from formative assessments for district, campus, and teacher analysis, and provided campuses with data-review protocols
  • Implements a comprehensive in-house professional development system for teachers and principals that is constantly updated to address district and campus needs
  • Provides intensive individualized support tailored to campus needs for schools identified by the district as “accelerated” schools
  • Provides a high level of guidance to school leaders and teachers but allows flexibility and autonomy in campus decision making
Comprehensive High School Improvement―MacArthur Senior High School

Area: 
Structures to Support Learning

Campus/District:
MacArthur Senior High School
Aldine Independent School District    

Overview:
The campus, which is primarily a Grade 10-12 school, serves a student population (total = 2,353) that is approximately 12% African American, 84% Hispanic,  4% White, 0.8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 83% economically disadvantaged, 7% limited English proficient (LEP), and 57% at risk.   

The percentage of MacArthur Senior High School (MSHS) students passing TAKS (all tests), was below the state average when the programming began in 2004–05 but has exceeded the state average since 2007–08.  Performance for the at-risk, economically disadvantaged, and LEP student groups also improved over that time. The campus also received and has sustained a Recognized accountability rating since 2006–07. Campus staff reported on a range of additional positive outcomes (see Supporting Evidencefor more information).   

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Uses data review and goal setting to address student performance at all levels
  • Provides free summer programming for students who failed ninth grade to move them to the next grade level
  • Developed an extensive summer program for all students to provide credit recovery, immediate and timely support, and academic  enrichment options
  • Offers immediate “reteach” opportunities for struggling students through Saturday classes, to minimize the number of students who fail courses
  • Implemented a supervision structure and planning schedule to support collaborative improvement efforts
  • Promotes student participation in extracurricular activities, college planning,  and advanced courses/dual enrollment
  • Employs professional development and hiring practices that focused on high expectations, enhanced curricular expertise, and providing additional student support
Content-Area Teams and Supplemental Instruction for High School Students--New Deal High School

Area:
Structures to Support Learning

Campus/District:
New Deal High School (Grades 9–12)
New Deal Independent School District

Overview:
New Deal High School (NDHS) serves a student population (total = 189) that is 4.2% African American, 41.8% Hispanic, 53.4% White, 55% economically disadvantaged, and 48.7% at risk.

The percentage of NDHS students passing TAKS (all tests) increased from 57% passing in 2002–03 to 83% passing in 2007–08. Completion rates also increased during this period (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus:
   

  •  Implemented content-area teams to vertically align curriculum and monitor student progress and interventions
  • Developed a more structured data review system and more frequent benchmarking
  • Provided supplemental instruction for struggling learners
Elementary Early Intervention Model―Lantrip Elementary (magnet)

Area: 
Structures to Support Learning

Campus/District: 
Dora B. Lantrip Elementary School
Houston Independent School District

Overview:
Lantrip Elementary School (LES) in Houston ISD (HISD) serves a student population (total = 696) that is 3% African American, 95% Hispanic, 2% White, 89% economically disadvantaged, 42% limited English proficient (LEP), and 58% at risk. The campus operates an environmental science magnet program.

In 2004–05, the campus accountability rating was Academically Acceptable, and campus TAKS performance was at or below state averages for reading and mathematics. Since 2005–06, the percentage of LES students passing reading TAKS and the percentage of students passing mathematics TAKS has increased from 89% and 85% respectively to 95% passing in both subject areas in 2009–10. The campus received and has maintained an Exemplary accountability rating since 2007–08 (see Supporting Evidence for more information). 

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Used professional learning communities (PLC) to conduct ongoing progress monitoring and weekly data review  and promote strategies for teaching English language learners (ELL).
  • Implemented a 3-tiered intervention process targeting early reading and literacy development, especially for English language learners, but extended to all students and all core subjects
  • Established an Intervention Assistance Team, with a case manager assigned to students identified for Tier 3 interventions
  • Mandated gifted and talented (G/T) training for all teachers
  • Focused on foundational skill building and developing high student expectations
High School English as a Second Language (ESL) Program--Montwood High School

Area:
English Language Learners (ELL)

Campus/District:
Montwood High School (Grades 9–12)
Socorro Independent School District

Overview:
Montwood High School (MHS) serves a student population (total = 2,594) that is 1.8% African American, 89.7% Hispanic, 7.5% White, 0.3% Native American, 0.7% Asian/Pacific Islander, 55.9% economically disadvantaged, 5.5% LEP, and 66.5% at risk.

With the exception of 2006–07, MHS’s completion rate for LEP students has been consistently higher than state and peer campus averages for similar students. The campus also tracked TAKS exit-level performance for all students who had participated in the ESL program during high school and reported high passing rates in all subject areas (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Provides differentiated four-year graduation plans for both newcomer and intermediate ESL students
  • Offers courses specifically designed to address ESL student language, vocabulary, and content needs
  • Provides sheltered classes and co-taught transitional/mainstream courses staffed by ESL-certified teachers trained in the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) model
  • Promotes training and campuswide collaboration to support ESL students
  • Provides access to technology for ELLs and additional supports such as an ESL club, mentoring, and ongoing one-on-one support for struggling students.
High-Yield Dropout Prevention/Recovery Program―Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD

Area:
Dropout Prevention/Recovery

District:
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo Independent School District

Overview:
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD (PSJA ISD) serves a student population (total = 31,223) that is 0.3% African American, 99% Hispanic, 0.8% White, 0.2% Asian/Pacific Islander, 89% economically disadvantaged, 42% Limited English Proficient (LEP), and 74% at risk.

The district had previously struggled to address a higher than average dropout rate. Since implementation of the new programming, completion rates for all students and at-risk students have risen above state and peer district averages (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

 In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Prioritized dropout prevention and recovery districtwide, creatively combining a variety of TEA dropout prevention grants to support new initiatives
  • Implemented “Countdown to Zero” to systematically identify, account for, and recover school leavers
  • Opened a campus to serve non-graduating seniors and recovered dropouts between the ages of 21 and 26 with funding from House Bill 1137
  • Provides tailored alternative academic options and support for struggling students such as transitional communities and mentoring programs
  • Addresses work, transportation, and childcare barriers for at-risk and recovered dropout students
  • Revamped Career and Technical Education (CTE) and dual enrollment programming to provide a strong college and career focus for at-risk students supported through partnerships with local higher education institutions
Increasing Rigor and Student Engagement in Middle School Social Studies--Del Valle Middle School

Area:
Social Studies

Campus/District:
Del Valle Middle School (Grades 6–8)
Del Valle Independent School District

Overview:
Del Valle Middle School (DVMS) serves a student population (total = 940) that is 19.4% African American, 69.8% Hispanic,9.3% White, 1.2% Asian/Pacific Islander, 73.2% economically disadvantaged, 11.5% limited English proficient (LEP), and 54.7% at risk.

The percentage of DVMS Grade 8 students passing state social studies assessments increased from 69% passing TAAS in 2001–02 to 93% passing TAKS in 2007–08 on TAKS with the highest increases for African American students (95% passing) and Hispanic students (92% passing) (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Increased student interest in content
  • Focused on vocabulary development
  • Used pre-AP strategies in regular classrooms
  • Incorporated strategies based on multiple intelligences research
Language Development and Advancement Strategies for English Language Learners (Grades 6–12)―Plano ISD

Area:
English Language Learners (ELL)

District:
Plano Independent School District

Overview:
Plano ISD (PISD) serves a student population (total = 54,683) that is 11% African American, 19% Hispanic, 50% White, 0.4% Native American, 21% Asian/Pacific Islander, 24% economically disadvantaged, 12% Limited English Proficient (LEP) and 23% at risk.

TAKS outcomes (all tests) for PISD LEP students at the secondary level were consistently above state averages for similar students (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Uses Book Club and Writing Workshop strategies to engage secondary ELLs in intensive high-level explorations of texts and language practice
  • Promotes course completion and advanced coursetaking for ELLs
  • Offers free extended learning and enrichment opportunities tailored to ELL student needs
  • Provides support and equal access to educational opportunities for newcomers and other ELLs from diverse language backgrounds
  • Supports implementation of the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS)
Mastering the TEKS for Algebra Readiness—Lufkin Middle School

Area:
Mathematics/Algebra Readiness

Campus/District:
Lufkin Middle School
Lufkin Independent School District

Overview:
Lufkin Middle School (LMS) serves a student population (total = 1,780 ) that is 31% African American, 31% Hispanic, 37% White, 1% Asian/Pacific Islander, 69% economically disadvantaged, 6% limited English proficient (LEP), and 34% at risk.

The percentage of LMS students (all students) passing mathematics TAKS has increased from 80% in 2005–06 to 89% in 2009–10.  Over the same time period, the percentage of African American students passing increased from 67% to 82%, the percentage of Hispanic students passing increased from 78% to 89%, and the percentage of economically disadvantaged students passing increased from 73% to 85% (see  Supporting Evidence for more information).

LMS was identified as an Algebra Readiness Exemplar Campus by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to share best practices with campuses applying for TEA Algebra Readiness grants. 

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Provided extended learning time in mathematics through scheduling and tutoring
  • Structured collaborative teacher planning time to facilitate a team approach to address student needs and grade-level coherence in mathematics instruction
  • Developed a non-textbook curricular approach based on strict adherence to teaching the grade-level TEKS in depth
  • Shared activities and common assessments to align instruction and facilitate data review while still allowing for teacher flexibility and autonomy in classroom teaching
  • Utilized a variety of activities and relationship building strategies to enhance student engagement
Middle/Early High School Interventions for At-Risk Students--Cypress-Fairbanks ISD

Area:
Dropout Prevention/Recovery

Campus/District:
Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District

Overview:  
Cypress-Fairbanks ISD (CFISD) serves a student population (total = 96,456) that is 15.7% African American, 8.8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 38.1% Hispanic,  37.1% White, 41.5% economically disadvantaged, 16.9% LEP, and 40.0% at risk.

CFISD’s completion rates for all students and at-risk students have been consistently above both state and peer district comparison group averages (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the district:
  

  • Assigns staff to each middle and high school campus to provide tailored academic interventions and proactive dropout prevention services for struggling students
  • Identifies staff mentors for struggling students
  • Requires that all students complete a year-long ninth grade study skills course
  • Provides literacy interventions and mathematics labs
  • Operates an alternative high school with night classes and a community college atmosphere
  • Partners with area agencies to address truancy issues
Ninth-Grade Teaming to Support College and Career Readiness--Carnegie Vanguard High School (magnet)

Area:
College and Career Readiness

Campus/District:
Carnegie Vanguard High School (Grades 9–12)
Houston Independent School District

Overview:
Carnegie Vanguard High School (CVHS) serves a student population (total = 371) that is 21.3% African American, 28.6% Hispanic, 45% White, 5.1% Asian/Pacific Islander, 31% economically disadvantaged, and 5.9% at risk.

The percentage of CVHS ninth-grade students performing at the Commended level on both TAKS mathematics and reading increased, from 52% in reading and 42% in mathematics in 2005–06 to 83%  in reading and 73% in mathematics in 2007–08 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Offers a rigorous four-year plan of pre-AP and AP coursework
  • Requires all teachers to be trained in Gifted/Talented strategies
  • Established a ninth-grade team and common team planning period to respond to individual student needs
  • Requires intensive writing assignments  and long-term research projects in all subject areas
  • Added a study skills component to the ninth-grade program
  • Requires students to create a portfolio related to college choices and requirements
Outreach and Support for At-Risk Students--Katy ISD

Area:
Dropout Prevention/Recovery

District: Katy Independent School District

Overview:
Katy ISD (KISD) serves a student population (total = 53,762) that is 9.6% African American, 29.7% Hispanic,  50.8% White,  9.7% Asian/Pacific Islander, 25.2% economically disadvantaged, 13.4% limited English proficient (LEP), and 39.3% at risk.

KISD’s completion rates (for all students and at-risk students) have been consistently above state averages (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Implements a case management approach to support at-risk students in completing high school
  • Used High School Allotment funds to create campus staffing positions to coordinate student support
  • Acts on early warning indicators to identify and target students in need of interventions
  • Operates an alternative high school that offers smaller class settings, flexible schedules, and self-paced instruction
  • Maintains detailed records to effectively support students and monitor progress
  • Builds rapport with struggling students and provides personalized services
Pathways to College and Careers--Hidalgo Early College High School

Area:
College and Career Readiness

Campus/District:
Hidalgo Early College High School (Grades 9–12)
Hidalgo Independent School District

Overview:
Hidalgo Early College High School (HECHS) serves a student population (total = 893) that is 99.8% Hispanic, 90.6% economically disadvantaged, 24.9% Limited English Proficient (LEP), and 64.8% at risk.

HECHS’s advanced course/dual enrollment completion rates and percentage of Recommended High School Plan (RHSP)/Distinguished Achievement Plan (DAP) graduates were higher than state average and peer district averages (see Supporting Evidence for more information).  


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Established Career Pathways, the district’s Career and Technical Education (CTE) Program
  • Established agreements with area colleges to provide student access to  dual enrollment and/or locally articulated college courses and technical certification programs
  • Sends middle and high school teachers to Advanced Placement Program (AP) training to increase rigor across the curriculum
  • Provides a master’s degree professional development incentive to increase the number of dual enrollment courses that can be taught by HECHS staff on campus
  • Requires all middle school students to take a class to explore career options, engage in career planning, and choose a career pathway to pursue
Whole-School Strategies for Improvement--Brownwood High School

Area:
Structures to Support Learning

Campus/District:
Brownwood High School (Grades 9–12)
Brownwood Independent School District

Overview:
Brownwood High School (BHS) serves a student population (total = 864) that is 8.4% African American, 30.7% Hispanic, 60.3% White, 49.9% economically disadvantaged, and 47% at risk. 

The percentage of BHS students passing TAKS (all tests) increased from 59% passing in 2004–05  to 75% passing in 2008–09. The percentage of students performing at college-ready levels on exit-level TAKS in English language arts and mathematics also increased (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus

  • Implements a Zeroes Aren’t Permitted (ZAP) policy and mandatory after-school ZAP sessions for students to complete assignments
  • Vertically aligned curriculum from elementary through high school in all core subject areas
  • Provides Advanced Placement  program (AP) training for all core-area teachers
  • Trained teachers in data review and analysis to conduct regular departmental review of student data 
Vertical Teams-Taylor Ray Elementary School

Area:
Structures to Support Learning

Campus/District:
Taylor Ray Elementary School (Grades EE–5)
Lamar Consolidated Independent School District

Overview:
Taylor Ray Elementary School (TRES) serves a student population (total = 701) that is 6.1% African American, 79.3% Hispanic, 14% White, 73% economically disadvantaged, 28% limited English proficient (LEP), and 63.8% at risk.

The percentage of TRES students passing TAKS (all tests) increased from 85% passing in 2002–03 to 98% passing in 2007–08 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Implemented content-area vertical and grade-level teams to collaborate across subject areas and grade levels
  • Provided professional development to teachers on data usage and on how to work in teams
  • Uses the vertical team/grade-level team structure to recommend strategies and interventions to address identified issues and to learn from each other about successful teaching strategies   
Two-Way Dual Language Program--Johnson Elementary School

Area:
English Language Learners (ELL)

Campus/District:
Johnson Elementary School (Grades K–5)
Bryan Independent School District

Overview:
Johnson Elementary School (JES) serves a student population (total = 400) that is 6% African American, 41% Hispanic, 51.5% White, 1.3% Asian/Pacific Islander, 44.3% economically disadvantaged, 23.5% limited English proficient (LEP), and 45.3% at-risk.

Staff reported that by second grade, more than half of JES dual language students identified as LEP had reached Advanced or Advanced High proficiency on most TELPAS language domains, and more than half of English-speaking students were considered to have developed grade-level Spanish reading and comprehension skills (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:  

  • Phased in dual language programming grade-by-grade providing instruction in the core content areas in Spanish and English for combined groups of Spanish- and English-speaking students
  • Provides support for program participants integrating into mainstream English-only courses
  • Staffs the program with certified teachers trained in research-based second language acquisition strategies
  • Integrates cultural components into instruction
  • Engages parents and families and the school community
  • Offers a dual language summer enrichment program
Timely Interventions in Middle School Mathematics--Brandenburg Middle School (magnet)

Area:
Mathematics

Campus/District:
The Classical Center at Brandenburg Middle School (Grades 6–8)
Garland Independent School District

Overview:
Brandenburg Middle School (BMS) serves a student population (total = 1,120) that is 20.6% African American, 33.3% Hispanic,  40.8% White, 4.6% Asian/Pacific Islander, 43.8% economically disadvantaged, and 25.6% at-risk.

The percentage of BMS students passing mathematics TAKS increased from 71% passing in 2004–05 to 90% passing in 2008–09 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Established grade-level teams and a common planning period during the school day for all mathematics teachers
  • Conducts weekly Professional Learning Community meetings to review classroom data, share successful strategies, and develop common instructional activities to be used in all classes
  • Uses commonly developed weekly quizzes to provide students with immediate feedback
  • Implemented a mathematics lab as an elective requirement for students struggling in mathematics
  • Focuses on hands-on activities and use of technology to support mathematics instruction
  • Established mentoring groups for small groups of struggling students to provide additional support
Teacher Collaboration to Support Algebra Readiness—Greiner Exploratory Arts Academy

Area:
Mathematics/Algebra Readiness

Campus/District:
W.E. Greiner Exploratory Arts Academy (magnet)
Dallas Independent School District

Overview:
Greiner Exploratory Arts Academy (GEAA) serves a student population (total = 1,689) that is approximately 10% African American, 87% Hispanic, 2% White, 0.4% Native American, 0.4% Asian/Pacific Islander, 86% economically disadvantaged, 22% limited English proficient (LEP), and 48% at risk. Approximately 30% of students participate in the campus’ fine arts magnet program.

The percentage of GEAA students passing mathematics TAKS increased from 74% passing in 2005–06 to 87% passing in 2009–10. The percentage of GEAA students performing at the Commended level on mathematics TAKS also increased from 12% in 2005–06 to 32% in 2009–10. Staff reported that the percentage of students participating in Pre-AP mathematics classes in Grades 6–7 increased from approximately 20% to 50% in recent years, and the percentage of Grade 8 students participating in Algebra I increased from approximately 20% to 45% (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

GEAA was identified as an Algebra Readiness Exemplar Campus by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to share best practices with campuses applying for TEA Algebra Readiness grants.

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Maximizes the benefits of collaborative planning time through grade-level and departmental teams with high standards for sharing expertise and resources, lesson planning, and cross-curricular instruction
  • Creates an annual master plan for mathematics instruction based on student data
  • Refines and extends the instructional plan continuously based on ongoing data review, including well-developed lessons that incorporate engaging learning and real-world application projects
  • Provides opportunities for teachers to share lesson demonstrations, ideas, and resources to vertically align instruction
  • Provides additional support to struggling students through multiple extended learning opportunities (e.g., tutoring, Saturday school, enrichment classes)
  • Develops student, teacher, and departmental profiles to target specific student and teacher needs
  • Implements new teacher support and a peer coaching model based on teacher strengths, pairing teachers who need to develop skills in an area with the campus’ master teacher in that area
Sustaining and Expanding a K–2 Reading Initiative: Differentiated Instruction Through Classroom Learning Stations—Shallowater Elementary

Area:
Reading

Campus/District:
Shallowater Elementary School (PreK–1)
Shallowater Independent School District  

Overview:
Shallowater Elementary School (SES) serves a student population (total = 267) that is 38% Hispanic, 62% White, 52% economically disadvantaged, 5% Limited English Proficient (LEP), and 33% at-risk.

The percentage of SES Grade 1 students performing at the “Developed” level on the end-of-year Texas Primary Reading Inventory (TPRI) increased from 57% in 2004–05 to 73% in 2008–09. Staff reported that consistently high performance on Grade 3 reading TAKS at the district’s intermediate campus was additional evidence of program success (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

Based on high quality implementation of the Reading First (RF) initiative and high student performance outcomes, the campus was identified as a Reading First demonstration site grantee in 2009–10.

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Implemented key components of the RF initiative
  • Developed classroom learning stations to provide daily, tailored differentiated instruction
  • Supported staffing, professional development, and collaboration to sustain the initiative
Sustaining and Expanding a K–2 Reading Initiative: Campuswide Literacy Coaching and Collaboration—Iles Elementary School (magnet)

Area:
Reading

Campus/District:
Ella Iles Elementary School (Grades K–5)
Lubbock Independent School District

Overview:
Iles Elementary School (IES) serves a student population (total = 283) that is 63% African American, 33% Hispanic, 4% White, 91% economically disadvantaged, and 29% at risk.

The percentage of IES students, including the economically disadvantaged and at-risk student groups, passing reading TAKS was consistently above both state and peer campus averages (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Sustained and expanded its K–2 reading initiative schoolwide after funding ended to promote coherent literacy instruction through training, coaching, and collaborative teams
  • Retained staffing from the initiative to provide support at all grade levels
  • Implemented a 3-tiered reading model
  • Monitors progress of struggling or students
  • Supports home reading
Supplemental and Integrated Instructional Supports--School of Business and Management

Area:
College and Career Readiness

Campus/District:
School of Business and Management (Grades 9−12)
Dallas Independent School District

Overview:
The School of Business and Management (SBM) serves a student population (total = 538) that is 34.4% African American, 61.3% Hispanic, 2% White, 1.9% Asian/Pacific Islander, 62.6% economically disadvantaged, and 21.9% at risk.

The percentage of SBM students passing TAKS (all tests) increased from 82% passing in 2003–04 to 91% passing in 2007−08. The percentage of students performing at the Commended level also increased for all student groups and in all core content areas over this time period (see Supporting Evidence for more information). 


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Integrates and reinforces core subject-area content in business courses
  • Trained teachers in academic rigor and strategies to develop students’ self-management of learning
  • Integrated a study skills program into the curriculum
  • Supports ninth-grade students in identifying a career path and developing a six- to eight-year graduation plan identifying target college course selections
  • Conducts college awareness seminars 
Supplemental Academic Support for Students Struggling in Math--Boerne Middle School South

Area:
Mathematics

Campus/District:
Boerne Middle School South (Grades 7–9)
Boerne Independent School District

Overview:
Boerne Middle School South (BMSS) serves a student population (total = 823) that is 2.1% African American, 18.7% Hispanic, 77.6% White, 13.2% economically disadvantaged, and 8.6% at risk.

The percentage of BMSS economically disadvantaged students passing mathematics TAKS increased from 64% passing in 2003–04 to 73% passing in 2007–08 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Created a mathematics lab for struggling learners
  • Enhances instruction through intensive use of manipulatives and hands-on activities
  • Provides an after-school TAKS Blitz designed as an engaging, game-based content review activity
  • Uses Professional Learning Community concepts and vertical and grade-level teams to collaborate on interventions for struggling learners
Promoting Program Fidelity in Bilingual Model Implementation (Grades PreK–5)―Brownsville ISD

Area:
English Language Learners (ELL)

District:
Brownsville Independent School District

Overview:
Brownsville ISD (BISD) serves a student population (total = 49,080) that is 0.2% African American, 98% Hispanic, 2% White, 0.1% Native American, 0.3% Asian/Pacific Islander, 96% economically disadvantaged, 34% limited English proficient (LEP), and 66% at risk.

Since 2005–06, the percentage of BISD elementary English language learners (ELL) reaching the Advanced High level of proficiency on the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System (TELPAS) increased at all grade levels. The percentage of BISD elementary ELLs passing reading and mathematics TAKS one year after exiting LEP status was consistently higher than state averages for similar students. The percentage of BISD ELL students still participating in LEP programs in Grade 5 passing reading and mathematics TAKS was also higher than state and peer district comparison group averages for similar students (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Garnered Board and staff support and buy-in to prioritize ELL student needs
  • Developed guidelines and extensive resources to support model implementation with fidelity
  • Includes bilingual/ESL staff in major district planning and decisionmaking
  • Promotes implementation of the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) districtwide
  • Provides ongoing monitoring and campus-specific support to improve outcomes for ELLs
Student-Centered College Preparation Strategies--International School of the Americas (magnet)

Area:
College and Career Readiness

Campus/District:
International School of the Americas (Grades 9–12)
North East Independent School District

Overview:
The International School of the Americas (ISA) serves a student population (total = 463) that is 1.3% African American, 44.7% Hispanic, 49.5% White, 4.5% Asian/Pacific Islander, 14.7% economically disadvantaged, and 26.8% at risk.

ISA student participation rates in Advanced Placement (AP) testing for 11th and 12th graders increased from 29% in 2004–05 to 44% in 2006–07 with 66% of ISA students performing at or above the criterion score on at least one AP test (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:
  • Implemented grade-level teaming to collaboratively discuss and address individual student needs
  • Offers all students a full pre-AP and AP curriculum
  • Assigns project-based learning activities aligned with the core curriculum at every grade level
  • Supports students in designing and completing internships
  • Requires all students to complete annual portfolios
Strategies to Accelerate College Readiness--Challenge Early College High School

Area:
College and Career Readiness

Campus/District:
Challenge Early College High School (Grades 9–12)
Houston Independent School District

Overview:
Challenge Early College High School (CECHS) serves a student population (total = 404) that is 21% African American, 52% Hispanic, 22% White, 4.5% Asian/Pacific Islander, 50.7% economically disadvantaged, and 41.6% at risk.

The percentage of CECHS students who met the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Higher Education Readiness Component standard in mathematics increased from 49% in 2004–05 to 78% in 2007–08 and in ELA from 56% to 78%.
Advanced course/dual enrollment completion data also increased from 65% in 2003–04 to 79% in 2006−07 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the campus:
  
  • Conducts a freshman camp and early diagnostic assessments in order to design instruction and modify the master schedule to meet student needs
  • Implements double-blocking in reading/ELA and mathematics in order to allow time for depth, rigor, and intensive instruction in these subject areas
  • Requires students to keep portfolios of work
  • Requires students to self-grade and correct their own work in order to build student self-discipline and move students toward college-oriented behaviors
  • Offers a daily scheduled Homework Lab to provide additional individualized instructional support

Theory-Based Practice(2 summaries)

Parental Involvement--Hidalgo ISD

Area:
Structures to Support Learning

District:
Hidalgo Independent School District

Overview:
Hidalgo ISD (HISD) serves a student population (total = 3,395) that is 99.6% Hispanic, 89.8% economically disadvantaged, 56.1% Limited English Proficient (LEP), and 72% at risk.

Staff reported that HISD has seen increases in the number of parents participating in district activities, especially the number of parent volunteers at district campuses (see Supporting Evidence for more information).

In this summary, find out how the district:

  • Established campus-level parent centers staffed by Parent Involvement Facilitators
  • Sponsored weekly speaker meetings to increase family understanding of academic requirements and ways parents could support their children
  • Provided literacy training and family literacy kits to parents
  • Offered transportation for parents participating in district activities
  • Implemented the Parental Career Pathway Partnership Program, which provides opportunities for parents to obtain English literacy, workforce skills, and a postsecondary education  
Science, Math, Fine and Performing Arts, Reading and Technology (SMART) After-School Program--St. Mary's Academy Charter School

Area:
Structures to Support Learning

Campus/District:
St. Mary’s Academy Charter School

Overview:
St. Mary’s Academy Charter School (SMACS) serves a student population (total = 319) that is 3.8% African American, 77.4% Hispanic, 16.9% White, 1.9% Asian/Pacific Islander, 77.7% economically disadvantaged, and 39.8% at risk.

Staff reported that student participation in the after-school program impacted TAKS performance. The percentage of SMACS students passing TAKS (all tests) increased from 63% passing in 2004–05  to 93% passing in 2008–09 (see Supporting Evidence for more information).


In this summary, find out how the campus:

  • Offers free daily academic foundation and enrichment programming after school, as well as a Saturday school program, sessions during holidays, and a summer program
  • Provides after-school tutoring aligned with regular classroom instruction
  • Extends regular classroom instruction through hands-on activities and mini-labs
  • Partners with community programs to offer fine arts, sports, and technology programming