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Secondary Transition Guidance

 

On this page you will find information about transition from school settings to post-school settings. This transition process should begin as early as possible but formally begins when a student with a disability turns 16 (19 TAC §89.1055(g)(1-9) and 34 CFR §300.320(b)). Post-school settings and activities include:

  • Postsecondary education;
  • Vocational education;
  • Integrated employment (including supported employment);
  • Continuing and adult education;
  • Adult services;
  • Independent living; and
  • Community participation.

As early as possible, schools should begin developing programs and services, based on a student’s strengths, preferences, and interests that focus on:

  • Instruction;
  • Related services;
  • Community experiences;
  • Development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and
  • If appropriate, daily living skills and a functional vocational evaluation (34 CFR 300.43).

Helpful resources related to transition planning are provided below.

State Resources  

The Transition in Texas: Statewide High School Transition Network is lead by Education Service Center (ESC) 11. ESC 11 coordinates statewide activities that address high school student’s needs related to secondary transition. These activities include:

  • Local and statewide needs assessments;
  • State priorities;
  • Development of a state and regional plan; and
  • Evaluation of statewide activities’ effectiveness.

Legal Framework addressing Transition Services is available from ESC 18.

The Texas Project First website provides parents with information about Special Education in Texas. On the site’s home page, parents will find information most relevant to the age group of their child. Transition topics can be found under Age Ranges 11-16 and 17 -21.

State Agencies  

The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities is a 27-member board that ensures all Texans with developmental disabilities have the opportunity to become independent, productive and valued members of their communities. The Council works to ensure that the service delivery system provides comprehensive services and supports that are easy to access and that are cost effective.

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board helps Texas meet the goals of the state’s higher education plan, Closing the Gaps by 2015. Meeting these goals means a bright future of economic vitality, social independence, and civic engagement for the citizens of Texas.

National Resources  

The following resources provide information at the national level: 

 The Family Center on Technology and Disability supports organizations and programs that work with families of children and youth with disabilities. The center offers a wide range of information and services on the subject of assistive technologies.

The National Association of State Directors of Special Education has been providing dedicated leadership to continuously improve educational services and outcomes for students with disabilities in the states and federal territories for 70 years. Focusing on policies and practices to improve educational outcomes for students with disabilities is critical to ensuring their full participation and contribution in education, employment and society.

The IDEA Partnership Project (Partnership Project) works with state agencies and stakeholders to improve outcomes for students and youth with disabilities through shared work and learning. The IDEA Partnership reflects the collective work of more than 55 national and state organizations, technical assistance providers, and agencies. Together with the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), the Partner Organizations form a community with the potential to transform the way we work.

National Center on Secondary Education and Transition coordinates national resources, offers technical assistance, and disseminates information related to secondary education and transition for youth with disabilities in order to create opportunities for youth to achieve successful futures.

The Post-Outcomes Network assists with the dissemination of research findings and develops professional papers, briefs, teaching materials, and other publications designed to share information with a wide and diverse audience about research, promising practices, and policy recommendations.

The National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities supports the national implementation IDEA provisions to ensure successful school outcomes for students with disabilities by assisting local education agencies to increase school completion rates and decrease dropout rates among students with disabilities.

The National Post-School Outcomes Center helps state education agencies establish practical and rigorous data collection systems that will measure and profile the post-school experiences of youth with disabilities. The results will be used for national, state, and local reporting and—most importantly—to guide and improve transition services to this population.

The National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center assists states in building capacity to support and improve transition planning, services, and outcomes for youth with disabilities. Objectives include assisting State Education Agencies with collecting data on IDEA (2004) Part B State Performance Plan Indicator 13 and using that data to improve transition services.

The US Department of Education OSEP improves results for infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities aged birth through 21 by providing leadership and financial support to states and local districts.

Page last modified on 10/30/2014 12:39:04 PM.