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Fine Arts Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. What subject areas are included within Fine Arts ?

2. Are there TEKS for Fine Arts?

3. Are school districts required to offer Fine Arts, and what are the Fine Arts requirements for students?

4 . Are drill team and marching band considered as Dance and Music courses, respectively, within Fine Arts?

5 . Which of the Fine Arts subject areas may serve as a substitute for the Physical Education high school graduation requirements?

6 . Can courses in other academic disciplines substitute for the one credit Fine Arts high school graduation requirement in the Minimum, Recommended, and Distinguished Achievement Programs?

 7 . Can student participation in University Interscholastic League (UIL) One-Act Play contest count for the one credit Fine Arts high school graduation requirement in the Minimum, Recommended, and Distinguished Achievement Programs?

 8 . Can private music lessons be offered to students during the day?

 9 . Where can I obtain additional information and resources for Fine Arts education?

 


1. What subject areas are included within Fine Arts? 

Art (grades K-12), Dance (grades 9-12), Music (grades K-12), and Theatre (grades K-12) are the state-approved subject areas as listed under the Fine Arts Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS).

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2. Are there TEKS for Fine Arts? 

Yes. The Fine Arts TEKS can be accessed in 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 117. The TEKS describe what every student should know and be able to do at each grade level and organize Fine Arts education into four strands of learning – Perception, Creative Expression/Performance, Historical/Cultural Heritage, and Response/Evaluation. The Fine Arts TEKS are required when providing instruction in Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre.

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 3. Are school districts required to offer Fine Arts, and what are the Fine Arts requirements for students? 

A school district that offers grades K-12 must offer an enrichment curriculum that includes Fine Arts. School districts must ensure that sufficient time is provided for teachers to teach and for students to learn Fine Arts (19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A ,  §74.1 ,  §74.2 , and  §74.3). Fine Arts at the elementary and middle school levels include Art, Music, and Theatre. Fine Arts at the high school level include Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre. Elementary schools must provide TEKS-based instruction in all three Fine Arts subject areas (Art, Music, and Theatre) at each grade level (K-5). Middle schools must provide TEKS-based instruction in Art, Music, and/or Theatre in grades 6, 7, and/or 8. High schools must offer TEKS-based instruction in at least two of the four Fine Arts subject areas of Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre.

Effective the 2010-2011 school year and thereafter, all students in grades 6, 7, or 8 must take a Fine Arts course. Furthermore, one credit of Fine Arts is required to graduate from high school under the Minimum, Recommended, and Distinguished Achievement Programs.

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 4. Are drill team and marching band considered as Dance and Music courses, respectively, within Fine Arts? 

No. Drill team and marching band are extracurricular activities that are often components of Dance I-IV and Band I-IV, respectively.

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 5. Which of the Fine Arts subject areas may serve as a substitute for the Physical Education high school graduation requirements? 

None. Effective the 2010-2011 school year, a student may receive a Physical Education substitution credit for participation in the extracurricular activities of drill team and marching band/color guard, which are common components of Dance I-IV and Band I-IV, respectively. If the student is also enrolled and successfully completes the state-approved courses of either Dance I-IV or Band I-IV under the Fine Arts Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, then the student also receives a Fine Arts credit (in addition to the Physical Education substitution credit for participation in drill team or marching band/color guard).

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 6. Can courses in other academic disciplines substitute for the one credit Fine Arts high school graduation requirement in the Minimum, Recommended, and Distinguished Achievement Programs? 

Effective the 2010-2011 school year, the Career and Technical Education course of Principles and Elements of Floral Design may satisfy the one credit Fine Arts high school graduation requirement in the Minimum, Recommended, and Distinguished Achievement Programs. Otherwise, there are no other substitutions allowed for the one credit Fine Arts high school graduation requirement.

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  7.  Can student participation in University Interscholastic League (UIL) One-Act Play Contest count for the one credit Fine Arts high school graduation requirement in the mimimum, Recommended, and Distinguished Achievement Programs?  

No. Students may not receive Fine Arts credit simply for "participation" in UIL One-Act Play Contest or in a school theatrical production. To receive Fine Arts credit, students must enroll in and successfully complete Theatre Production I-IV or any other state-approved course listed under the Fine Arts TEKS. Additionally, and as with any other state-approved course, there are no state-mandated time requirements for Theatre Production I-IV, regardless of when the course is offered (during, before, and/or after school hours).

The Theatre Production I-IV curriculum developed and implemented by school districts must be aligned with and cover the student expectations of the Theatre TEKS. The UIL One-Act Play Contest can serve as a beneficial experience for students and as an effective instructional strategy for teaching certain components of the Theatre TEKS. It is not recommended, however, that the UIL One-Act Play Contest or any other extracurricular activity become the sole or primary focus of any academic course, including Theatre Production.

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  8.  Can private music lessons be offered to students during the school day?  

Local school districts may offer private study programs and have the authority to administer these programs as per the following guidelines:

  • the use of school facilities for private study is according to local school district policy;
  • the school district and students must both benefit from the private study program;
  • there must be adequate safeguards in place to ensure that the school district and students receive the full range of the intended benefits of the private study program;
  • although school districts as an entity may not charge students a fee for participation in a private study program, a private teacher may charge a fee in a manner as approved by the local school board of trustees; and
  • a private study program cannot be required of students as part of the curriculum and instruction of a course or for participation in any school activity.
  • It is also strongly recommended that school districts consult with attorneys and/or insurance agents concerning any potential liability issues related to private study programs. To ensure equal access to this enrichment opportunity, it is encouraged that local scholarship funds be available to students and parents whose income status may prevent participation in the private study program.

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  9.  Where can I obtain additional information and resources for Fine Arts education?  

The Center for Educator Development in Fine Arts (CEDFA) was established by the Texas Education Agency to support Fine Arts education in Texas Schools. CEDFA promotes implementation of the Fine Arts TEKS in addition to providing professional development opportunities and instructional resources for fine arts educators. The CEDFA web site address is http://www.cedfa.org.

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Page last modified on 1/5/2012 11:06:00 AM.